Ariel

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Ariel
Ariel is the fourth-largest of the 27 known moons of Uranus. Ariel orbits and rotates in the equatorial plane of Uranus, which is almost perpendicular to the orbit of Uranus, and so has an extreme seasonal cycle. After Miranda, Ariel is the second-smallest of Uranus' five major rounded satellites, and the second-closest to its planet. Among the smallest of the Solar System's 19 known spherical moons (it ranks 14th among them in diameter), it is believed to be composed of roughly equal parts ice and rocky material. Like all of Uranus' moons, Ariel probably formed from an accretion disc that surrounded the planet shortly after its formation, and, like other large moons, it is likely differentiated, with an inner core of rock surrounded by a mantle of ice. Ariel has a complex surface consisting of extensive cratered terrain cross-cut by a system of scarps, canyons and ridges. The surface shows signs of more recent geological activity than other Uranian moons, most likely due to tidal heating. Ariel (moon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Short Description Ariel is the fourth-largest of the 27 known moons of Uranus. Ariel orbits and rotates in the equatorial plane of Uranus, which is almost perpendicular to the orbit of Uranus, and so has an extreme seasonal cycle. After Miranda, Ariel is the second-smallest of Uranus' five major rounded satellites, and the second-closest to its planet. Among the smallest of the Solar System's 19 known spherical moons (it ranks 14th among them in diameter), it is believed to be composed of roughly equal parts ice and rocky material. Like all of Uranus' moons, Ariel probably formed from an accretion disc that surrounded the planet shortly after its formation, and, like other large moons, it is likely differentiated, with an inner core of rock surrounded by a mantle of ice. Ariel has a complex surface consisting of extensive cratered terrain cross-cut by a system of scarps, canyons and ridges. The surface shows signs of more recent geological activity than other Uranian moons, most likely due to tidal heating. Ariel (moon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Discovered by William Lassell
Discovery date 24 October 1851
Type Moon
AddInfo Uranus I
Satellite of Uranus
Orbit Prograde
Rotation Synchronous
Shape Equilibrium spheroid
Geological activity In the past
Apoapsis 06 191 130 km
Periapsis 06 190 670 km
Semi-major axis 06 190 900 km
Distance from Sun 02 19.218 4 au /15
Eccentricity 0.001 2
Orbital period 2.520 day
Orbital speed 01 5.5 km/s
Inclination to the equator 000.260°
Diameter/Size 04 1157.8 ± 1.2 km
Dimensions 1162.2 × 1155.8 × 1155.4 km
Mass 1021×1.353 kg
Density 01 1.592 ± 0.15 g/cm3
Surface gravity  0.269 m/s2
Escape velocity  559 m/s
Rotation period 2.520 day
Axial tilt
Albedo Bond 0.23
Albedo geometric 0.53
Temperature mean 02 60 K
Temperature max 02 84 K
Apparent magnitude 14.4
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